photos reviews books #ldnont 2020 vacant 2019 usa movies europe 2021 Notes street autos portraits works place 2018 proof of life shadows kevin people project Now race [this city] photo essays cafe 17 grand ave thresholds Podcasts bookshelf places called home Asides research Empty Urban Corners Internet art St.FX gender one book one london Gracie Career indigenous Idea my hometown sucks 52Weeks Literature TV shows Depression Email Yearly fav block party windsor fiction

Essentialism - The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown:

2020- My annual re-read of Essentialism, during No-vember, took me the entire month to read this time around. Sure, I wasn’t in a rush to read it, but for whatever reason I couldn’t find myself getting into it this year. Perhaps my brain was already mush having read so many books this year already. Then again, maybe the content and main point of the book is something I have consumed so many times that I simply glaze over much of the content. With that said, I was reminded that there is always room for improvement in how a person approaches an essentialist lifestyle and that no one is ever perfect. I am hopeful that in the future I will be in a leadership role where I have others looking to me for guidance & support and in turn employ some essentialist strategies to combat the very elements of leadership and management which drive me crazy.

2019- My annual re-read of this book as a reminder that it’s okay to say no, and not to feel bad about it. My realization in more recent months is this—taking things in life down to the most important is essential, but at some point yes’ needs to be said more often. I’ve excluded less important things for so long, to help me focus on what really matters, that I haven’t brought into my life some less-important things to help balance things out and to provide meaning and value to the things/experiences I cherish so very much. There needs to be a balance between the essential and the non-essential.

2018- An annual re-read, I took away this time around that saying no” sometimes is not enough. If an individual finds themselves saying no” long enough, without any yeses” to provide a necessary balance, both personal and professional lives may be unfulfilling. My anticipation is to re-read this again in early 2019 to provide some perspective for the year.

December 29, 2020 2018 2019 2020 reviews books


Previous post
According to Need - 99% Invisible An eye opening look at homelessness in California brought to the world by the 99% Invisible team. While I imagine
Next post
How to Read the News After many years of struggling to read the news I finally found the optimal process to make this activity bearable.